Trickle Down Thursday: Pet Waste

Poop is gross. Pets may be cute but their poop is still gross. When their excrement is left on the ground, the bacteria and waste remnants wash easily into the storm drain during a rainfall and are delivered to the lakes and rivers we play in. Don’t go boating in a poop river. Please, pick up after your pet.

This study in the National Institutes of Health database discusses the types of pathogens found in dog waste and their resistance to our most common antibiotics: http://bit.ly/37WSm3I

Waterwise Wednesday: Goin’ to the Dogs (and Cats)

Photo © Sunheyy

February holds several dog and cat designations: Dog Education Month, National Cat Health Month, Pet Dental Health Month and Responsible Pet Owners Month.

Part of good pet care is properly disposing of their waste. Pet waste is a leading source of both nutrient and bacteria pollution to urban streams and waterways. Feces carry concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and pathogens like Salmonella, E. Coli, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium.

Pet waste pathogens threaten the safety garden grown food and drinking water supplies and can lead to severe intestinal diseases in humans when ingested.

Avoid expose family and friends by picking up and properly disposing pet waste. Pet waste be collected then either flushed or sacked and placed in the trash.

What You Can Do to Help

Easy tips for keeping our water clean

  • Litter
    Litter disposed of in a storm drain can choke, suffocate and disable aquatic life. Dispose of your litter by throwing it in a trash can or recycling it. In addition, do your part by properly disposing of litter you find in the street or on the sidewalk.
  • Washing your car
    Washing your car in the driveway creates a runoff of soap and other chemicals that ends up in the nearest storm drain. You can either take your car to a self-service car wash, which is designed with special drains for proper disposal, or wash your car on your lawn. The dirt below will act as a filter for the soap.
  • Pet waste
    Pet waste dumped in storm drains goes straight into your rivers and lakes, contaminating the water. Continue reading What You Can Do to Help