Waterwise Wednesday: Wise Watering

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We’re in the hot and dry spell of summer here. Water landscapes wisely to help them thrive:

– Only water landscape plants when dry. Plants suffer more from overwatering than underwatering.

– Water the plant’s root zone, not the foilage, to save water and reduce disease.

– Adjust sprinkler heads to water plants, not sidewalks and curbs.

– Set timers to avoid over-watering

– Plan now to install more native shrubs and groundcover plants to reduce water demand in the future.

Waterwise Wednesday: Smart Water for Trees

Lawns can go dormant in a dry spell, but trees and shrubs remain active during growing season. We’re in the dry part of summer now, with moderate drought conditions when surface water level declines and plant growth can be stunted so please continue to water trees and shrubs.

When you water, wet the entire root area of the tree and soak the soil approximately 12 inches deep. A 6-to-8 foot tree uses about 2 1/2 to 3 gallons of water once a week.

Soaker hoses, trickle or drip systems can feed the root zone with minimum surface wetting and water waste. Alternatively, a berm around the tree or shrub base may be filled with water for slow infiltration and percolation into the root zone.


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Waterwise Wednesday: Truly Green Lawn Remedies

Problem: Lawnmowers create 5% of US air pollution (EPA)

Remedy: Buffalo Grass tops out between 4-5 inches and has a growing shorter season; thus requiring less mowing.

Problem: Lawn owners use 10 times the amount of pesticides and fertilizers per acre than farmers use on their crops (National Academy of Sciences).

Remedy: Native grasses are used to drier conditions. Even traditional grasses can be trained to use less water.

Problem: Traditional grasses use more water

Remedy: Native grass species require less chemical input since they’re already adapted to succeed in our soils and climate.

Problem: Native grasses aren’t as pretty, soft, green, etc.

Remedy: Check the different types. Tatanka buffalo grass is actually used on golf courses. (Which is an activity you’ll have more time for by raising a sustainable lawn.)

Waterwise Wednesday: Wind Down Watering

A cooler forecast heralds the official start of Autumn. Take nature’s cue and wind down lawn watering to once a week. According the Panhandle Bluegrass Calendar, now is the time for broad leaf weed control (like bindweed) too. Since broad leaf weeds stockpile nutrients to their roots in the early Fall, the herbicide is absorbed there too and works more effectively to eradicate the plant.

For more info see: https://extension.unl.edu/stat…/panhandle/turfgrass_calendar

 

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Waterwise Wednesday: Winter Watering

Trees and plants may be parched and in need of water due to Winter being very dry, windy and warm here in the Panhandle.

– Water trees, shrubs, lawns, and perennials during prolonged dry fall and winter periods to prevent root damage that affects the health of the entire plant.

– Water only when air and soil temperatures are above 40 degrees F with no snow cover. Apply water at mid-day so it will have time to soak in before possible freezing at night.

– To water trees, apply water to the most critical part of the root zone under the tree canopy and let the soil soak to a depth of 12 inches.