Waterwise Wednesday: The Falling Leaves

Photo © Mishkaki

As falling leaves drift to the ground, please clear them from storm drain grates and put them to better use. Leaves can easily clog storm drains creating preventable flooding and nutrient overload pollution.

There’s several good uses for those fallen leaves:

1. Shred and spread on the lawn for a nutrient boosting mulch.

2. Convert them to compost either in your own pile or put them in a city yardwaste bin and we’ll compost them at the Yardwaste Facility.

3. Use the leaves as mulch in your garden beds to protect the soil and hold moisture. Next spring till them into the soil for extra nutrients.

Waterwise Wednesday: Water Harvesting

Capture and reuse rain runoff to supplement regular watering and reduce demand on the public water system with these ideas.

1. Gently mound dirt along a plant’s dripline to hold and infiltrate runoff.

2. Re-use household wastewater from dehumidifiers or air conditioning condensers for irrigation.

3. Install a rain barrel or cistern. Rain barrels can store the water until the weather turns dry and is needed.

4. Plant a rain garden – the basin will hold runoff while providing the yard with color and pollinator habitat.

Photo via gilintx via Flickr CC

SWMP- Minimum Control Measure #5

Post-Construction Stormwater Management is the most recently implemented MCM in the SWMP. For projects to require Stormwater Treatment Facilities they need to have been preliminary platted after Sept 1, 2017 and greater than an acre in size.

SWMP- Minimum Control Measure #2

Stormwater Management Plan MCM #2 is Public Involvement and Participation. This correlates with the first MCM. Ideally, a person/group will use the education that occurred with the first MCM and turn that interest into a passion. Activities done in the past include volunteering opportunities for Curb Inlet Marking and Canal Cleanup.

Waterwise Wednesday: Kid Games

Need to keep the kids occupied while they’re home for break?

Try some of these water conservation games rounded up by Water, Use it Wisely.

Games

 

Waterwise Wednesday: It’s more than Big City

Denver’s Confluence Park, Chicago’s Riverwalk, and New York’s Highline Park are pretty, practical, and productive venues in their cities.
They’re all stormwater structures serving multiple purposes like water quality, flood prevention, recreation, habitat, and even economic development.

Scottsbluff’s Broadway bulb-outs, Riverside fishing ponds, and parking lot gardens follow the same philosophies using green infrastructure to provide not only water quality treatment but also places of recreation for our residents, habitats for a healthier environment, and ways to improve our quality of life.

Photos:
Riverside Ponds, L. Sato
Chicago Riverwalk, Armondo Sanchez, Chicago Tribune

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