February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Runoff = water that can’t soak into the ground. This water flows across rooftops, pavement, bare soil, and sloped lawns. As it flows it picks up sand, pesticides, bacteria, oils, metals, and solvents and carries these things directly into the storm drain. Polluted runoff is not treated before it reaches the river. This is the same river where we swim, hunt, fish, and play. To find out what you can do to keep our lakes and rivers clean, go here: http://bit.ly/3aRYfBd

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Good Housekeeping & Pollution Prevention is an internal measure. Here, we focus on providing training to staff to control pollution, maintaining and executing a street sweeping schedule, and flushing and maintenance of the storm sewer pipes and inlets. The overall goal is to minimize the stormwater pollution impact through daily operations.

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Post-Construction Stormwater Management primarily works to ensure the stormwater treatment facilities installed during construction are maintained and functioning as designed. This effort maintains the cleanliness of the stormwater that leaves our city even through progress and growth. Our Post-Construction Guidance Manual can be found here: http://bit.ly/3mYixev

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Pollution often starts at construction sites but it doesn’t have to. The people working on a construction site are a first line of defense for our rivers. Implementing design standards, best management practices, and erosion control measures can keep dirt, chemicals, and trash out of our streets and storm sewers. Find construction guidance here: https://bit.ly/34T1wMM

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Illicit discharges occur when chemicals, fertilizers, waste, and trash get into our storm system. You can help by properly disposing of household hazardous wastes and reporting any questionable discharges you see. Find more information here: http://bit.ly/34QR9sU

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Volunteers are the single greatest asset to our stormwater program. These people work to prevent pollution which then preserves our drinking water, recreational waters, and agricultural waters. Our volunteers protect our way of life. Volunteer here: http://bit.ly/2WRCRUr

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

We believe that by informing the public about pollutants in our area and providing ways to prevent that pollution, we can reduce the number of pollutants entering our waterways. Test your stormwater knowledge here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WKPJM7D

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

The City of Grand Island follows a Stormwater Management Plan to improve the quality of stormwater runoff from an area 2 miles larger than city limits. This plan is regulated by the EPA and the State of Nebraska. It includes 6 minimum control measures to be met and documented:
1. Public Education & Outreach
2. Public Involvement & Participation
3. Illicit Discharge Detection & Elimination
4. Construction Stormwater Requirements & Control Measures
5. Post-Construction Stormwater Management Program
6. Pollution Prevention & Good Housekeeping

Waterwise Wednesday: Tree Watering

Photo © Boris Ryaposov

Water newly planted trees. Recent high temperatures coupled with wind and low humidity make new trees more susceptible to stress.

1. Water trees slowly at the base of plants to give them a deep soak. Avoid frequent short waterings, like the lawn, which provide only shallow moisture.

2. Water in the morning to avoid evaporation and help the tree cope the heat of the sun throughout the day.

3. Soaker hoses or tree bags work well for the slow soak tree watering and a 3″ layer of can provide a new tree a buffer from heat, retain water, and avoid root competition with weeds.

Trees are valuable assets to our community. They help shade from heat, shield from cold, manage stormwater, prevent erosion and fight air, water, and noise pollution. So set them up for success with good watering now.

Waterwise Wednesday: Multipurpose Ponds

Did you know the Riverside Park fishing ponds also help manage the city’s stormwater runoff?

The ponds at Riverside Park provide scenic greenspace, recreation, and even food (fish) while safely routing and cleaning our stormwater runoff on the way to the North Platte River. Terrytown and Gering include Terry’s Lake and the water hazards at Monument Shadows Golf Course in their stormwater systems too.

Stormwater travels untreated through the storm sewer, so protecting stormwater runoff from pollutants also protects our public fishing, our scenic water spaces, and our water recreation.

Photo: Riverside Fishing Bridge by L. Sato