Waterwise Wednesday: Groundwater Recharge

Photo © Dreamstock

Groundwater naturally recharges as rainfall or other surface water infiltrates into the ground. Precipitation falls on the land, soaks through the soil and moves to the water table. Natural recharge can also occur when water seeps from rivers, streams, lakes, and wetlands to the water table. Much of Gering’s groundwater recharge occurs this way from the North Platte River and canal systems.

However, low precipitation this winter means groundwater levels haven’t recharged to typical levels. This makes water conservation more important.

Plan now to conserve water with:
– native plant landscapes
– efficient watering systems set with water saving practices like a drip system set for early morning or late evening watering and moisture sensor to avoid over watering.
– water harvesting practices like rain barrels or directing downspouts to lawn and garden areas
– utilizing indoor water saving techniques like shorter showers, full laundry and dishwasher loads and low-flow faucet taps and shower heads.

Waterwise Wednesday: Fall Water Tips

Photo © creativecommonsstockphotos

1. Change the Timer. Cooler weather means lawns require less water.

2. Do a thorough sprinkler system check and make necessary repairs. A line puncture 1/32nd of an inch in diameter wastes up to 6,300 gallons of water per month, which is higher than both Scottsbluff and Gering’s monthly minimum water use rate. (Rates increase for water use above 5,000 gallons per month in both cities.)

3. Plan(t) Ahead. Fall is a great time to introduce native perennials and grasses to your landscaping. They establish root systems during the fall and, once mature, will use less water and chemicals than traditional landscape plants.

Waterwise Wednesday: Wise Watering

Photo © publicdomainstockphotos

We’re in the hot and dry spell of summer here. Water landscapes wisely to help them thrive:

– Only water landscape plants when dry. Plants suffer more from overwatering than underwatering.

– Water the plant’s root zone, not the foilage, to save water and reduce disease.

– Adjust sprinkler heads to water plants, not sidewalks and curbs.

– Set timers to avoid over-watering

– Plan now to install more native shrubs and groundcover plants to reduce water demand in the future.

Greening Up the Urban Environment- Part II

The following is Part II of a three part series focusing on the City of Scottsbluff’s 319 grant projects.  These projects are designed to reduce impervious cover in parking lots, filtering and infiltrating stormwater runoff.  This article will go over challenges and lessons learned from the projects.  For an overview of the projects, see Part I.

street trees, urban landscaping, parking lot landscaping, downtown landscaping
This landscape is designed to reduce stormwater runoff and eventually help cool the parking lot, combating the heat island effect and moderating the temperature of stormwater runoff

In our last article, we went over the process of removing concrete and installing landscaping to create green areas throughout our downtown parking lots.  There are several factors that, when combined, make it extremely difficult for a landscape to be successful in an urban environment. The following is a list of those challenges, along with a few of the lessons that we have learned so far.  Over time, we will be continuing to observe and experiment with these landscapes to determine the best ways to make them successful. Continue reading Greening Up the Urban Environment- Part II