Fertilizer + Pesticides = $$$$

Fertilizer, pesticides, and other lawn chemicals are expensive. Save your money by following these tips:

  • Spot treat your weeds: instead of treating the whole yard, dig up or spray the root of individual plants.
  • Clean up with a broom: sweep any dry chemicals off your sidewalk, driveway, or street and back into your yard or collect it for next time. Fertilizing your pavement won’t make it grow and these chemicals will just wash away with the next rain.
  • Set your mower height at or above 3″: a taller lawn keeps the weeds from getting enough sunlight AND helps the grass develop a better root system, requiring less water.
  • Follow package instructions: if you have to apply chemicals, please read and understand package instructions before you apply. These chemicals really only work in specific seasons, on specific plants, or at controlled concentrations. You may do more harm than good by applying before a rain, during a dormant season, or overapplying.

Trickle Down Thursday: The Cost of Water

Take a moment to consider: how much do you spend on bottled water? Where does that bottled water come from? What makes it preferable to filling a glass from the tap? What are your reasons for buying bottled water? Do those reasons outweigh the price? Learn more about tap water: http://bit.ly/3aY7yQ9

Waterwise Wednesday: Water $avings

Photo © Vladimir Kindrachov

“If all U.S. households installed water-saving features, water use would decrease by 30 percent, saving an estimated 5.4 billion gallons per day. This would result in dollar-volume savings of $11.3 million per day or more than $4 billion per year.” – USGS 2015 Water Census

Water Quality Wednesday: Drops to Watts

Ever considered the electrical cost of water?

“Homes with electric water heaters, for example, spend one-fourth of their total electric bills just to heat water,” according to EPA. It takes energy to pump, treat, deliver and heat the water we use. Running a faucet for five minutes uses about as much energy as letting a 60-watt light bulb run for 14 hours.

Pay yourself, literally, by using Water Sense and Energy Star qualified devices like water heaters, dishwashers, sprinkler systems, shower heads, toilets and faucets. They’re designed to save both water and electricity.