Got Batteries?

This holiday season you may find yourself purchasing more batteries, but what happened to the old ones? Remember that old batteries do not belong in the trash. They are built out of chemicals found in heavy metals; at a landfill, these chemicals can soak in and contaminate our water supply. Please take the time to dispose of them properly! Contact Interstate Battery or Best Buy for proper disposal.

Don’t Just “Throw it in the Trash”

Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) is any substance containing ingredients that could negatively affect your safety, health or the environment. Alerting words found on hazardous products include:

  • poison
  • danger
  • warning
  • caution
  • toxic
  • flammable
  • corrosive
  • explosive
  • irritant

They can be found on a wide range of products in and around the home, including:

  • furniture polish
  • bleach
  • antifreeze
  • insecticides
  • paint
  • mothballs
  • many more
Image result for household hazardous waste

Another hazardous property you may see on a label is reactive. This means the product contains chemicals that, if combined with certain other substances, could result in hazardous reactions such as gaseous emissions or explosions.

Visit our Clean Community System site to learn more.

Hazmat Storage

If you live or work where there are large volumes of hazardous materials, please remember to store all hazardous materials in properly marked containers and in secure places. Check the container for holes, keep them where they won’t get wet, replace any damaged containers, and dispose of any unused chemicals properly. View the EPA’s guide to federal requirements for more information.

Trickle Down Thursday: Cleaning Professionals

What would your life look like if the cleaning staff stopped showing up? These amazing people keep our work lives and living spaces neat, clean, sanitary, and smelling nice. They also do their part to keep our waterways clean by properly disposing of excess cleaning products. Mop water, soapy water, and the mysterious-cleaner-hiding-in-the-back-of-the-cabinet-from-decades-past do not belong in our storm drains. Visit https://www.cleancommunity.org/ for proper disposal information.

Illicit Discharge Detection & Elimination: Household Hazardous Waste

Common household products (i.e.. batteries, cleaners, paints, medications, light bulbs) contain heavy metals and/or chemicals that are toxic to aquatic and human life. Don’t just throw them in the trashcan or pour them on the ground; dispose of them properly. Take them to our Household Hazardous Waste Facility or an appropriate disposal site. Click here to learn more: https://www.cleancommunity.org/

Waterwise Wednesday: Project Pollution Prevention

Photo © Jameswimsel


House projects, both indoors and out, create potential pollutants that can get caught in storm runoff when used or disposed improperly.


1. Purchase and use nontoxic, biodegradable, recyclable, and recycled products whenever possible to reduce detrimental environmental effects.


2. Follow label directions for substances like paint, solvent, or cleanser that can contain toxic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Use the smallest amount possible, absorb any spills immediately and dispose of the waste safely. Store substances properly to avoid leaks and spills.


3. Clean paintbrushes in a sink, not outdoors, to prevent VOCs and other toxins from flowing into the storm system. Filter and reuse paint thinner when using oil based paint. Properly dispose of paint by pouring out and drying on scrap carpet or taking unused paint to Environmental Services.


4. Sweep and properly dispose of construction debris like concrete and masonry.


Waterwise Wednesday: Hazardous Household Cleaners

Photo © Johanna Goodyear

Household cleaners we use to sanitize, degrease, whiten and wash can also harm water. The “Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)” – Phosphorus, nitrogen, ammonia are common ingredients in cleansers.

Phosphorus composes 30 to 40 percent of dishwasher detergents. Ammonia is included in products for degreasing, sanitizing and removing allergens. Nitrogen is found in glass cleaners, surface cleaning products, and floor cleaners.

Nitrogen, phosphorus and ammonia cannot be removed by waste treatment processes. Instead they enter waterways, build up and cause accelerated and excessive growth of some types of plant life including algae. The dense vegetation clogs waterways, crowds out animal life and other marine plants.

The large amount of plant material also depletes oxygen in the water as it decays. The lack of oxygen in water suffocates freshwater marine life, further degrading the water with decay.

Choose, or make, cleansers free of VOCs. So when you clean your home, your water stays clean too.