Waterwise Wednesday: Fire(works) and Water

Photo: S. Schanaman

Fireworks contain Persistent, Bioaccumulative, and Toxic chemicals (PBTs) like copper, lead, perchlorate, and lithium to create their effects and remain on firework debris. PBTs remain in the environment for very long periods of time, are highly resistant to degradation, easily enter and quickly accumulate in the food chain and can be toxic to both humans and animals.

– Please pick up firework debris. Let spent fireworks sit only until they’re not longer hot or burning then move them to a bucket with water.

– Water used to soak spent fireworks should be flushed in a toilet so the water can be treated at the wastewater treatment plant. Please do not pour the water down the gutter or on the lawns to avoid contaminating ground and water with PBTs.

– Sweep small firework particles and put them in a plastic bag for disposal in the trash. The particles are prone to travel in the wind or in water runoff spreading PBTs to soils and waterways.

Construction Bulletin April 2014

Goals for Construction Site Runoff Management

Ahh, Spring— warmer weather, thawing ground, and afternoon rain showers.   While welcoming the change of season,  it’s also time to consider Best Management Practices (BMPs) for keeping the soil on site and preventing stormwater run off and sediment pollution.

The ultimate goal for construction site runoff management is to prevent the pollution of stormwater runoff.  Best Management Practices (BMPs) aim to slow the velocity, control the volume, and/or  filter  site run– off.  Stormwater permits require BMPs to address erosion and sediment run-off, soil exposure, ground disturbance, compaction,  buffers,  outlet protection, and stabilization.  Below are some BMPs to consider for construction sites.

Grass

Stabilization, or planting ground cover,  allows run off to infiltrate the ground providing nutrients to the plants and replenishing ground water. Stabilization is required by the Nebraska general construction permit as soon as practicable on sites and no more than 14 days after construction activities have ceased.

 

Slope Drain

When the slope is steep channeling the runoff through a slope drain can be an effective erosion control.  Drains may be made of pipe,  s shown, or a constructed channel lined with rock,  turf replacement mats,  and wattles to slow the flow of water.

 

Flexible Gutter

Flexible rain gutters can direct roof water away from exposed soil.  The gutters can channel water to impermeable areas (e.g. concrete driveways) where clean stormwater can run to the gutter or to vegetated areas where plants and soil can absorb the water

InspectionRegular inspection,  every 14 days and within 24 hours of a 1/2” rain event,  is the best way to insure construction site BMPs are working effectively.  Look for evidence, or  potential,  of pollutants entering the drainage system.  An inspection report must be identify any incidents of non-compliance with permit conditions and actions taken to correct the issue.  If no incidents of non-compliance were found, the report must contain a certification that the site is in compliance with the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). The  reports should be retained with the SWPPP for up to three years after the permit expires or is terminated.