Waterwise Wednesday: Trees Tame Stormwater

Trees play a critical role in managing our city’s stormwater runoff. Enjoy this interactive poster from the Arbor Day Foundation highlighting the role trees play in urban stormwater management.

https://www.arborday.org/trees/stormwater.cfm

Waterwise Wednesday: Cold Weather, Hot Water

We tend to compensate for cold temperatures with hotter showers and running water longer to make sure the water is definitely warm before sticking our hands under the tap.

Collect the water that runs while waiting for the warmer water for plants, pets, cooking, or drinking. Chances are, you’ll be saving two to eight gallons – plenty to take care of several tasks that don’t require hot water.

Photo: nikkytok

Waterwise Wednesday: Natural Clog Buster

Got a slow moving drain? Skip caustic chemicals and flush the drain with vinegar and baking soda. Vinegar and baking soda can clear out grease and dissolve organic material trapped in your pipes.

Start by pouring a pot of boiling water down the drain. Then sprinkle one cup of baking soda into the drain, quickly followed by a cup of vinegar. Insert the drain cap or a rag to keep the bubbles working in the pipe. Let the mixture sit in the pipes for 15 minutes to an hour Finish with one more flush of boiling water down the pipes.

Water Quality Wednesday: Drops to Watts

Ever considered the electrical cost of water?

“Homes with electric water heaters, for example, spend one-fourth of their total electric bills just to heat water,” according to EPA. It takes energy to pump, treat, deliver and heat the water we use. Running a faucet for five minutes uses about as much energy as letting a 60-watt light bulb run for 14 hours.

Pay yourself, literally, by using Water Sense and Energy Star qualified devices like water heaters, dishwashers, sprinkler systems, shower heads, toilets and faucets. They’re designed to save both water and electricity.

 

 

Waterwise Wednesday: Policy Works

Researchers, led by Estelle Chaussard from the University of Buffalo, link ground water recovery in Santa Clara Valley California to the state’s newly instated water conservation efforts—policies that diverted surface water to refill aquifers

In 2013, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSARa) measured a 2-centimeter decrease in ground-level elevation, followed by another 3 centimeters in 2014. The research team estimates a groundwater loss of about a tenth of a cubic kilometer caused the ground to shrink or lower.

Ground surfaces began to expand and rise in September 2015, rising nearly 2 centimeters over the next two years and were at pre-study levels by the end of 2016. This reflects the same time surface water diversion policy went into effect.

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Waterwise Wednesday: Nebraska Water Trivia

1. True or False: Nebraska houses the most miles of river in the U.S.

2. True or False: Nebraska manufactures and uses the most center pivot irrigation systems in the world.

3. True or False: Nebraska contains the most groundwater of the fifty states.

1. True. Four major rivers, and many small rivers, flow nearly 23,000 miles across the state.

2. True. The top four center pivot system manufacturers are based in Nebraska and supply 85% of the global demand. Nebraska manufactures utilizes about 60,000 center pivot systems.

3. True. We sit on the High Plains Aquifer, which reaches eight states, the largest source of groundwater in the U.S.

Waterwise Wednesday: The Heat is On

 

It’s mid-summer, Panhandle temperatures rise and both the landscape and drought map begin to turn yellow and gold. According to the Drought Monitor, Scotts Bluff County is now experiencing abnormally dry conditions.

The water we use now greatly affects the supply we have in the future – especially if drought conditions spread and continue. Scottsbluff’s water system relies on groundwater pumped through wells, instead of surface water, which replenishes very slowly. Dry or drought conditions cause less regeneration of the ground water supply. Please use water wisely and conservatively.

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/…/current/current_high_plains…

Waterwise Wednesday: Cold Water Tips for a Hot Day

1. Keep a pitcher of drinking water in the refrigerator. Running water through the tap until it’s the right temperature can waste several gallons of potable water.
2. Leftover ice cubes from your drink? Give them to a houseplant, it provides a nice slow watering.
3. When the kids want to run in the sprinkler, set the sprinkler where the lawn needs it most.

Waterwise Wednesday: Too Wet

Many lawns are over-watered leading to root rot, shallow-rooted plants and the spread of fungal growth on the grass. Horticulturists agree that lawns should get no more than 1 inch of water per week, including rainfall. An empty can placed on your lawn can be used to measure accumulation and moisture sensors attached to automated systems can help prevent over watering.

Waterwise Wednesday: What a drip!

Drip and emitter systems conserve water by regulating volume, velocity, and direction of water flow. Plants can be targeted with a slow steady specific quantity of water using drip tubes or emitters. This prevents over watering and watering where not needed. And the systems are discreet, designed to function effectively while lying under a layer of mulch.