Waterwise Wednesday: Water Cost

Water is essential in the production of our food. And with greater awareness of water conservation those processes are changing our processing and consuming of food.

-Ag research looks for higher yields with less water
-Food factories develop less water intensive production methods
-Consumers shop local, eat whole/fresh foods, and reduce meat consumption

For reference, one liter equals about one quart in the graphic below.

No photo description available.

SWMP- Minimum Control Measure #6

Good Housekeeping/Pollution Prevention deals with the impact of Municipal Employees activities on stormwater pollution. All municipal employees receive training on minimizing their influence on stormwater by implementing Best Management Practices (BMP’s) in their everyday work.

SWMP- Minimum Control Measure #5

Post-Construction Stormwater Management is the most recently implemented MCM in the SWMP. For projects to require Stormwater Treatment Facilities they need to have been preliminary platted after Sept 1, 2017 and greater than an acre in size.

Water Wise Wednesday: Another Way to Tell Time

A drip a second from a leaky faucet sends five gallons of water down the drain in a day. An hour could be measured as 3,364 drips or about 3 3/4 cups of water.

According to the US Geological Survey, a typical drip is between 1/5 and 1/3 of one milliliter. Using 1/4 of a milliliter as an average, the USGS estimates that roughly 15,140 drips from a faucet equals one gallon of water.

In the end, it’s probably easier (and cheaper) to just set the clock ahead for Daylight Savings Time this Sunday.

Copyright: Dreamstime.com

Waterwise Wednesday: Water $avings

Photo © Vladimir Kindrachov

“If all U.S. households installed water-saving features, water use would decrease by 30 percent, saving an estimated 5.4 billion gallons per day. This would result in dollar-volume savings of $11.3 million per day or more than $4 billion per year.” – USGS 2015 Water Census

SWMP- Minimum Control Measure #4

Construction Stormwater Management is a key part of controlling Stormwater Pollution. The City of Kearney has at least 120 building permits out at any point in the year. A lot of these disturb the soil and require Best Management Practices to control erosion and sediment movement.

Waterwise Wednesday: Water Business

Water conservation ranks as a “top five” priority for the next decade for 99% of business managers surveyed according to WaterUseitWisely.com.

Try these tips and see how much your business can save:

1. Learn where your company uses water – landscape, restrooms, break rooms, and create usage goals for those areas.

2. Shut off water to unused areas to eliminate waste from leaks or unmonitored use.

4. Create a goal of how much water your company can save and publish the company’s monthly water use to show progress toward those goals.

5. Educate employees on good water habits through newsletters and posters.

Photo © creativecommonsstockphotos

SWMP- Minimum Control Measure #3

The City of Kearney’s IDDE Program depends a lot on the ‘eyes on the ground.’ In order to identify issues such as discharges that could negatively impact stormwater pollution, the City of Kearney relies on communication within its departments and the citizens of our municipality. There are established ways of communication: 308-233-3273; stormwater@kearneygov.org; and ‘Access Kearney’ at www.cityofkearney.org.