LEAVE IT ON THE LAWN

Leave It On The Lawn

When leaves fall to the ground, they eventually break down and provide nutrients for the soil, helping prepare more plants to grow in the spring. When you keep leaves out of the street you help your yard AND the storm sewer system, which can get clogged with leaves as they freeze and take up valuable space designated for water. If you don’t like the look of leaves in your yard, take advantage of the City of Kearney’s landfill which is open Monday-Friday from 8a.m.-5p.m. For more specific information about the landfill click here.

Waterwise Wednesday: Toothbrush Challenge

Can you brush your teeth, including rinsing your mouth and toothbrush, with a 1/4 cup of water?

Yes, it is possible!

Americans waste up to eight gallons of water each tooth-brushing session. Simply turning off the tap while brushing your teeth can save over 100 gallons per month.

Pollution Prevention Series

Please click the links below for more information on how individual business can help prevent stormwater runoff pollution!!

Pollution Prevention for Auto Servicing

Pollution Prevention for Concrete Industry

Pollution Prevention for Fueling Stations

Pollution Prevention for Restaurants

Pollution Prevention for the Auto Repair Industry

Waterwise Wednesday: Nebraska Water Trivia

1. True or False: Nebraska houses the most miles of river in the U.S.

2. True or False: Nebraska manufactures and uses the most center pivot irrigation systems in the world.

3. True or False: Nebraska contains the most groundwater of the fifty states.

1. True. Four major rivers, and many small rivers, flow nearly 23,000 miles across the state.

2. True. The top four center pivot system manufacturers are based in Nebraska and supply 85% of the global demand. Nebraska manufactures utilizes about 60,000 center pivot systems.

3. True. We sit on the High Plains Aquifer, which reaches eight states, the largest source of groundwater in the U.S.

STABILIZED ENTRANCE

Stabilized Entrance

Construction sites should implement a stabilized entrance, commonly referred to as a ‘rock entrance,’ in multiple cases:

  1. Where dirt or mud can be tracked onto roads
  2. If they’re adjacent to water bodies
  3. If they have poorly compacted soil
  4. Where dust is a problem during dry weather

 

The City of Kearney has detailed specifications on rock entrances in the Public Works Department link at the sediment and erosion control details page.

Waterwise Wednesday: Reading Coffee Rings

The coffee ring could be a new test for drinking water quality. Tap water leaves distinct patterns and whorls its dried residue, like a coffee ring. The markers indicate water hardness and alkalinity, as well as the presence of dissolved solids and metals.

Researchers at Michigan State University hope the ‘Coffee – Ring Effect’ will provide an inexpensive and accessible way for people to identify traits in their drinking water.

 

 

 

 

Photo: Yuto Ooi et al. CC- Modified from http://www.tandfonline.com/…/…/10.1080/14686996.2017.1314776

Waterwise Wednesday: It’s the Rules

For many people, taking care of the environment is common sense. It’s also required by law.

Scottsbluff operates under the National Pollution Discharge and Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II Municipal Separate Storm Sewer (MS4) General Permit. The permit

encompasses six general areas:
– Public Education and Outreach
– Public Involvement
– Illicit Discharge, Detection and Elimination
– Construction Stormwater
– Post-construction Stormwater
– Good Housekeeping/Pollution Prevention for Municipalities

The city’s stormwater surcharge not only pays for MS4 infrastructure but also the programming that educates residents and become active in pollution prevention and preserving water quality.

Photo: Scottsbluff outfall SO-164 in June.

Waterwise Wednesday: Permeable Pavement

Permeable pavement allows water to pass through the surface into the ground generating more groundwater recharge, faster melting of ice and snow, and decreasing the amount of water runoff from a property. Porous concrete, porous asphalt, or interlocking pavers are also good for trees whose roots can access the air and water that flow through the pavers.

Photos: (Top) Demonstration of porous concrete. (Bottom) Water runoff comparison of permeable asphalt and standard concrete.

SOIL AMENDMENTS

Soil Amendments

A good soil is just like a good recipe, they both need key ingredients to be successful. The two main ingredients in soil are sand and clay. Various other minerals like limestone, sulfer, and others are added to it in smaller doses. A “good” soil is considered a medium loam and roughly consists of:

 

  • 10% coarse sand
  • 45% fine sand
  • 20% silt
  • 15% clay
  • 10% organic material

Please visit landscaping.about.com for more information on soil amending.

Waterwise Wednesday: Bottled from Where?

Bottled waters seem to flow from all sorts of exotic places like arctic glaciers, hidden bubbling springs and the tropical waters of Fiji. The US Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA) identifies water sources to help consumers determine the source of their bottled water.

  • Artesian water, groundwater, spring water and well water all come from an underground aquifer which may or may not be treated.
  • Well water and artesian water are tapped through a well.
  • Spring water is collected as it flows to the surface or via a borehole.
  • Ground water can be either tapped by well or captured at the surface source.
  • Bottled water may also come from a public water source (municipal water) and may be identified as coming from a community water system.