Waterwise Wednesday: Too Wet

Many lawns are over-watered leading to root rot, shallow-rooted plants and the spread of fungal growth on the grass. Horticulturists agree that lawns should get no more than 1 inch of water per week, including rainfall. An empty can placed on your lawn can be used to measure accumulation and moisture sensors attached to automated systems can help prevent over watering.

Waterwise Wednesday: What a drip!

Drip and emitter systems conserve water by regulating volume, velocity, and direction of water flow. Plants can be targeted with a slow steady specific quantity of water using drip tubes or emitters. This prevents over watering and watering where not needed. And the systems are discreet, designed to function effectively while lying under a layer of mulch.

Western Nebraska Wildflower Week 2017

Wildflowers endure through hard times, lending their beauty and brightness even to landscapes rarely seen by human eyes. Their flowers and seeds feed birds, butterflies and other pollinators and wildlife; their roots loosen and improve soil; they thrive without care in places other plants could never survive; and they lend fragrance and beauty to wild places all across the state, making us want to take a closer look at places we would otherwise ignore.

Updates on events can be found at http://plantnebraska.org/wildflower .

Wildflower Week Events in Western Nebraska

June 8 in Scottsbluff. “It’s a Green Thing,” 4-9pm Parking Lot Party at the Guadalupe Center, 1200 E 9th St. Plant Sale and activity booths 4-9pm include: 4:30-5:30pm planting demonstration and rain garden/pollinator project overview; goldenrod and pollinator presentations at 6 and 7pm. 308-630-8011, stormwater@scottsbluff.org

June 9 in Gering. “High Plains Prairie Garden Planting Project” 9-10am at Legacy of the Plains Museum, 2930 Old Oregon Trail.  Downtown Plaza Tour 11-noon meeting at 18th St. Plaza. 308-633-1173, aseiler2@unl.edu

June 9 near Crawford. Fort Robinson Wildflower Hike 5-7pm; meet at Crawford Community Building to carpool. 402-580-1293; jevertson1@unl.edu.

June 10 at Chadron State College. Landscape Tour and Pollinator Garden Planting 9-noon. Meet in parking lot along 10th St. frontage near High Rise Dorm. 308-432-6401, lmays@csc.edu

June 10 near Gering. “Wildflower Walk” 9-11am at the Wildcat Hills Nature Center, 210615 Hwy 71. Walk will focus on wildflowers and ways to identify them. Bring water and hiking shoes for the 1-mile hike. FREE with 2017 Nebraska State Park Permit. ngpc.wildcat.hills@nebraska.gov, 308-436-3777, http://outdoornebraska.gov/wildcathillsnaturecenter/

June 11 near Harrison. “Wildflowers 101” talk and walk with a ranger through lowlands, prairie and rocky uplands to see a variety of wildflowers starting at 2pm at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument visitor center, 301 River Rd. Trails are open dawn to dusk. agfo_ranger_activities@nps.gov, 308-668-2211, https://www.nps.gov/agfo/planyourvisit/calendar.htm

 

Waterwise Wednesday: Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial Weekend officially launches summer fun season which often includes water games and activities. The water doesn’t have to go waste. Play water games on the lawn or in the pool so that the aftermath simply waters the lawn fills or trickles back to the pool.

Water Wise Wednesday: Blowing in the Wind

Keep water from evaporating or blowing in the wind by using a sprinkler that produces large drops of water and send droplets out at a low angle. Adjust sprinkler heads as necessary, to avoid waste, runoff and ensure proper coverage.

Waterwise Wednesday: Rain Gardens

Rain gardens capture and infiltrate runoff from roofs, driveways, and other impervious surfaces. Rain gardens not only recharge groundwater supplies, but also clean out pollutants, create pollinator habitat, increase property value, and provide year round visual interest for your home.

Check out this interactive rain garden animation from UNL extension.

Waterwise Wednesday: Celebrate Arbor Day, Plant a Tree

Nebraska is home of Arbor Day, which we celebrate this Friday.  See just how much work trees do!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Downspout Redirection

Downspout Redirection

Take full advantage of the rain showers this spring by redirecting your downspouts onto your yards. Make sure your downspouts deposit rainwater where it can be put to good use. The amount of rainwater that gets into the street will be greatly reduced and your gardens and yards will benefit greatly from it. Remember to try to direct rainwater at least 5 feet from house foundations to prevent potential leakage! For more information visit the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation.

Waterwise Wednesday: The First Flush

The first flush is the initial runoff from a storm and tends to carry a higher concentration of pollutants compared to later in the storm. Common contaminants picked up in the first flush include:
– sediment from roofs
– yardwaste, animal waste, fertilizers, pesticides and de-icing compounds from driveways and yards
– brake dust, tire residue, heavy metal and trash from street surfaces

Simple ways to reduce the concentration of pollutants in the first flush include using lawn chemicals as directed, biking or walking more and creating landscapes that promote natural infiltration.

Graphic courtesy of cleanwatercampaign.org

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