Waterwise Wednesday: Garden Hose Tips

Use an adjustable shut-off nozzle which can be down to fine spray so that water flows only as needed. Turn it of at the faucet instead of the nozzle when finished to avoid leaks.

Use hose washers between spigots and water hoses to eliminate leaks.

Do not leave sprinklers or hoses unattended. 600 gallons or more can flow in only a few hours. Set a shut-off reminder to turn it off.

 

Check all hoses, connectors and spigots regularly.

Install ornamental water features, like fountains, only if the water is recycled. 

 

Image may contain: outdoor

 


Photo: © Creative Commons Zero (CC0)

Waterwise Wedneday: Lawn Watering Tips

Don’t overwater your lawn and remember a hearty rain eliminates the need for watering for as long as two weeks.

Water lawns early in the morning – the lower temperature and wind speed are reduce evaporation.

Position sprinklers to water the lawn and shrubs … not the paved areas.

 

 

 

Raise the mower to at least three inches.   Image may contain: grass, shoes, outdoor and natureTaller grass encourages deeper rooting and shades the roots to retain soil moisture.

Avoid overfertilizing. Fertilizers increase the need for water and mowing.

Sweep, not wash, clippings back to the lawn from the driveway or sidewalk. Washing the driveway can waste hundreds of gallons of water.

Waterwise Wednesday: Rain Harvesting Romans

Image may contain: sky, grass, plant, cloud, mountain, outdoor and natureRecent research suggests rain harvesting may have provided the 800 Roman soliders manning Hadrian’s Fort with 10 liters (2.62 gallons) of drinking water per per capita per day during their deployment.

Evidence at Hadrian’s Fort, a strategic Roman outpost along Hadrian’s Wall in northern England, indicates building rooftops were constructed to capture rainfall. The runoff collected in stone-lined tanks, two to six tanks per key building, capable of holding 2 cubic meters (about 528 gallons) of water each.

It’s an amazing feat of foresight, considering Hadrian’s Fort has no internal springs or wells, access to springs or waterways in the region, and an aqueduct supply would have been extremely impractical.

Photo by David Ross
Hadrian’s Wall at Steel Rigg
Twice Brewed, Northumberland, England