Trickle Down Thursday: The Cost of Water

Take a moment to consider: how much do you spend on bottled water? Where does that bottled water come from? What makes it preferable to filling a glass from the tap? What are your reasons for buying bottled water? Do those reasons outweigh the price? Learn more about tap water: http://bit.ly/3aY7yQ9

Waterwise Wednesday: Planning, Policy and Protection

Photo © creativecommonsstockphotos

Scottsbluff, Gering and Terrytown work to preserve water quality, implement good stormwater management and flood prevention. Some of the cities’ tasks include:

– Working with agencies to identify and map floodplains, wetlands and riparian areas.

– Determining areas for development, avoidance, and other sensitive areas.

– Integrating natural drainage features or low impact features into planning to minimize disturbance.

– Collaborating with agencies for proper management and preservation of riparian zones, community forestry, and land management techniques.


Trickle Down Thursday: Storm Drains to River

Did you know: in Grand Island, our storm water runs untreated to the river but our sewer lines run separately to the wastewater treatment plant? This means that any trash, leaves, grass, soil, road salt, and engine fluids on our streets are on a direct path to the rivers and lakes we play in.

Waterwise Wednesday: Avoid Holiday FOG Clog

Prevent FOG (Fats, Oils and Grease) Clog this holiday season and throughout the year to reduce overflows, backups and clogs:

Never pour FOG down kitchen sinks, garbage disposals or into toilets!

Instead:
– Let FOGs cool after cooking, then put them into a disposable plastic bag, securely seal or tie, then put into the trash.

– Wipe pots, pans and plates with paper towels to capture any leftover grease before washing.

– Use a drain strainer to keep grease and food scraps out of the kitchen sink drain.

Photo © Rawpixel Images

Waterwise Wednesday: Winter Tree Watering

Photo © Publicdomainphotos

Trees – a vital part of our green infrastructure – may be dormant now, but they are still susceptible to cold and dry conditions. Lack of water through the winter season can damage root systems. The weakened trees may look normal in the spring, but will usually die back later in the summer.


Protect your trees with these winter watering tips:

– Water only when the temperature is above 40 degrees with no snow or ice on the ground.

-Water early in the day, so the water can soak in before the temperature drops at night.

– Use a soaker hose to focus water on the roots and avoid spraying branches or evergreen foilage.

– Water trees one or two times per month until they begin leafing out in the spring.

Waterwise Wednesday: Protect Your Pipes

Prevent a pipe from freezing and bursting to save your pipes, water, and property.

Photo © Ruslan Khabirov
Chrome faucet with water drop

– Keep the indoor temperature in your home 55 degrees Fahrenheit or warmer

– Drip faucets overnight when the temperature is expected to be well below freezing. It may seem like a waste, but the moving water will prevent the pipe from freezing.


– Collect the water in a bucket to flush your toilets or water your plants.

– Securely cover exposed outdoor pipes and hose bibs with pipe insulation to prevent freeze and burst.

– Check for leaks after any thaws. Temperature changes can cause pipes to expand and contract, leading to more leaks.

– Know exactly where the main water shut-off valve is located. Turning off the water quickly after discovering a leak saves hundreds of gallons of water.