STORMWATER RUNOFF

Stormwater Runoff

Stormwater runoff comes from precipitation events and when snow/ice melts onto impervious surfaces. An inch of rain on an acre of land is equivalent to 27,154 gallons of water with a weight of 113 tons. This water transports many pollutants, including but not limited to sediment, oil, grease, fertilizers, bacteria from pet waste, and litter/trash. Stormwater DOES NOT get treated prior to being flushed into waterways.

Infiltration Practices

INFILTRATION PRACTICES

Infiltration practices are designs that enhance water percolation through the soil and remove pollutants in the process. A ‘Rain Garden’ is a common residential design, and an aesthetically appealing project! As snow melts, it’s runoff accumulates in these depressed/trenched areas. Captured water generally leaves to the neighboring soils within 48 hours. Directing water from roof downspouts or paved areas enable the removal of pollutants prior to discharge into receiving waters. For more information visit the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation.

Western Nebraska Wildflower Week 2017

Wildflowers endure through hard times, lending their beauty and brightness even to landscapes rarely seen by human eyes. Their flowers and seeds feed birds, butterflies and other pollinators and wildlife; their roots loosen and improve soil; they thrive without care in places other plants could never survive; and they lend fragrance and beauty to wild places all across the state, making us want to take a closer look at places we would otherwise ignore.

Updates on events can be found at http://plantnebraska.org/wildflower .

Wildflower Week Events in Western Nebraska

June 8 in Scottsbluff. “It’s a Green Thing,” 4-9pm Parking Lot Party at the Guadalupe Center, 1200 E 9th St. Plant Sale and activity booths 4-9pm include: 4:30-5:30pm planting demonstration and rain garden/pollinator project overview; goldenrod and pollinator presentations at 6 and 7pm. 308-630-8011, stormwater@scottsbluff.org

June 9 in Gering. “High Plains Prairie Garden Planting Project” 9-10am at Legacy of the Plains Museum, 2930 Old Oregon Trail.  Downtown Plaza Tour 11-noon meeting at 18th St. Plaza. 308-633-1173, aseiler2@unl.edu

June 9 near Crawford. Fort Robinson Wildflower Hike 5-7pm; meet at Crawford Community Building to carpool. 402-580-1293; jevertson1@unl.edu.

June 10 at Chadron State College. Landscape Tour and Pollinator Garden Planting 9-noon. Meet in parking lot along 10th St. frontage near High Rise Dorm. 308-432-6401, lmays@csc.edu

June 10 near Gering. “Wildflower Walk” 9-11am at the Wildcat Hills Nature Center, 210615 Hwy 71. Walk will focus on wildflowers and ways to identify them. Bring water and hiking shoes for the 1-mile hike. FREE with 2017 Nebraska State Park Permit. ngpc.wildcat.hills@nebraska.gov, 308-436-3777, http://outdoornebraska.gov/wildcathillsnaturecenter/

June 11 near Harrison. “Wildflowers 101” talk and walk with a ranger through lowlands, prairie and rocky uplands to see a variety of wildflowers starting at 2pm at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument visitor center, 301 River Rd. Trails are open dawn to dusk. agfo_ranger_activities@nps.gov, 308-668-2211, https://www.nps.gov/agfo/planyourvisit/calendar.htm

 

Waterwise Wednesday: Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial Weekend officially launches summer fun season which often includes water games and activities. The water doesn’t have to go waste. Play water games on the lawn or in the pool so that the aftermath simply waters the lawn fills or trickles back to the pool.

EARTH DAY

EARTH DAY

Earth Day is April 22 (EVERY YEAR). It may only be one day a year, but implementing simple conservation practices year-round takes very little extra effort and time. The City of Kearney’s Recycling Center is located at 3007 E. 39th St. and is open 7 a.m.- 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. There are multiple drop-off locations around Kearney:

1919 15th Ave

South Side of Herbergers (Hilltop Mall)

University Heights on the Northwest corner of 17th Ave/35th St.

CLICK FOR MAP OF DROP OFF SITES           South Railroad St./Ave M

Waterwise Wednesday: Seeing Salty Sidewalks

If there is a layer of salt remaining on the driveway or sidewalk after the ice melts, too much salt got sprinkled. If you find excess sand or salt, sweep it up and throw it away so that it is not washed into the storm sewer.

One teaspoon of salt is enough to contaminate five gallons of water forever. Salts, like the de-icers we use in winter, stay in water without settling out contaminating and damaging the North Platte River and freshwater lakes where we fish.

Construction Stormwater Management

Construction Stormwater Management

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #4 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff from construction activities that result in land disturbance. An Erosion and Sediment Control program is being followed and an ordinance has been enacted within the City Code. Design standards meeting the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) and the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit requirements are available on the City website. There are Erosion and Sediment Control best management practices (BMPs) for a construction site no matter what the size. 

Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #3 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to minimize the effect of illicit discharges and illicit connections within the community. An IDDE program is followed and an ordinance has been enacted within the City Code. Dry weather inspections of storm sewer outfalls are regularly performed. A detailed storm sewer system is maintained to track flow of stormwater and identify affected areas from illicit discharges.  Access Kearney on the City of Kearney’s website allows the public to acknowledge their concerns regarding all forms of stormwater pollution. 

Public Involvement and Participation

Public Involvement and Participation

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #2 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM partly goes along with the first MCM, Public Education and Outreach. The idea is to use the informed public to get involved to the point of participating in activities that benefit the environment in any way imaginable. With this enthusiasm the public will be spreading the idea of stormwater pollution prevention via word of mouth among members of the community and beyond. 

Public Education and Outreach

Public Education and Outreach

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #1 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to education the public on the benefits of keeping our receiving waters clean of pollutants. An informed public can make a significant reduction in the amount of stormwater pollutants that enter our storm sewer systems. Multiple media formats are used to convey this information. Social media, websites, radio, television, household awareness surveys and more all play a role in this process.