Minimum Control Measure #3 Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

KEARNEY STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

MCM #3 Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

Waterwise Wednesday: Snow Science

Cloudy winter days make the snow melt faster, says a study from the University of Utah. Snow is designed to stay cold in three ways: by deflecting the sun’s heat with it’s bright white color and crystalline structure, the bright white reflecting heat back at night, and sublimation, evaporating from snow to vapor, similar to the way sweat evaporates from our skin to keep us cool.

Cloudy humid days, however prevents snow from deflecting, reflecting and sublimating warming the snow. That is why a few humid days with temperatures hovering around the freezing point create large melt events and even minor flooding.

Do your own experiment by watching snow that remains in shadows even on warm sunny days. Then watch what happens to that same snow during gray days and nights — quickly, though, before it’s all gone.

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POROUS PAVEMENT

Porous Pavement

Porous pavement allows stormwater and snow melt to pass through voids in the paved surface and infiltrate into the subbase. This type of drainage allows for less chance of ice on the roads to to quicker dispersal time. Porous pavement may be constructed from four basic material types:

  1. Asphalt
  2. Concrete
  3. Paver Blocks
  4. Plastic Grid Systems

For more information on porous pavement please visit www.werf.org

POCKET WETLANDS

Pocket Wetland

Pocket wetlands in urban areas filter, clean, and store water from multiple sources. They’re a place for rain and snow/ice melt to drain to. Wetlands act like sponges by holding flood waters and keeping rivers at normal levels. Multiple types of designs for pocket wetlands exist, with the volume, dry storage, and pond depth being the deciding differences. For more information on pocket wetlands please visit www.werf.org

Waterwise Wednesday: Policy Works

Researchers, led by Estelle Chaussard from the University of Buffalo, link ground water recovery in Santa Clara Valley California to the state’s newly instated water conservation efforts—policies that diverted surface water to refill aquifers

In 2013, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSARa) measured a 2-centimeter decrease in ground-level elevation, followed by another 3 centimeters in 2014. The research team estimates a groundwater loss of about a tenth of a cubic kilometer caused the ground to shrink or lower.

Ground surfaces began to expand and rise in September 2015, rising nearly 2 centimeters over the next two years and were at pre-study levels by the end of 2016. This reflects the same time surface water diversion policy went into effect.

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MEET OUR STREET SWEEPERS

Meet Our Street Sweepers

Street sweepers are an effective tool against pollutants on the street getting into the storm sewer system. But to be effective they must move slowly. Studies have shown the optimum speed for a sweeper is 5 miles per hour. Fortunately, they are big-white- and have flashing lights to alert you of their slower speeds. Please proceed with caution when you see these slow moving vehicles.

Waterwise Wednesday: Levees of Leaves

  Falling leaves signal the official arrival of Autumn. Put leaves to good use as insulating mulch in a garden bed, make them into compost, or shred them across the lawn as a natural fertilizer. Left to lie in gutters, leaves quickly clog storm drains leading to flooding in a Fall storm and nutrient pollution as the leaves degrade in the storm sewer. Pile ’em up and enjoy the benefits of leaves next spring!