SOIL AMENDMENTS

Soil Amendments

A good soil is just like a good recipe, they both need key ingredients to be successful. The two main ingredients in soil are sand and clay. Various other minerals like limestone, sulfer, and others are added to it in smaller doses. A “good” soil is considered a medium loam and roughly consists of:

 

  • 10% coarse sand
  • 45% fine sand
  • 20% silt
  • 15% clay
  • 10% organic material

Please visit landscaping.about.com for more information on soil amending.

COMPOSTING PROCESS

Composting Process

Heat generated from bacteria causes the compost pile to stay warm and active, no matter which season you’re in. Ideally, new material should be added to the composting system during turning and mixing to keep the pile the most active. Visit www.earth911.com to find more information on different composting methods including hot, cold, sheet, and trench composting. Also, to find out what items are good types of compost click here for lists of acceptable and unacceptable materials.

 

 

 

 

 

              FROM THIS…………………………..TO THIS

 

 

STORMWATER RUNOFF

Stormwater Runoff

Stormwater runoff comes from precipitation events and when snow/ice melts onto impervious surfaces. An inch of rain on an acre of land is equivalent to 27,154 gallons of water with a weight of 113 tons. This water transports many pollutants, including but not limited to sediment, oil, grease, fertilizers, bacteria from pet waste, and litter/trash. Stormwater DOES NOT get treated prior to being flushed into waterways.

Infiltration Practices

INFILTRATION PRACTICES

Infiltration practices are designs that enhance water percolation through the soil and remove pollutants in the process. A ‘Rain Garden’ is a common residential design, and an aesthetically appealing project! As snow melts, it’s runoff accumulates in these depressed/trenched areas. Captured water generally leaves to the neighboring soils within 48 hours. Directing water from roof downspouts or paved areas enable the removal of pollutants prior to discharge into receiving waters. For more information visit the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation.

Good Housekeeping/Pollution Prevention

Good Housekeeping/Pollution Prevention

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #6 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to minimize the effect of the municipality’s efforts to the contribution of stormwater pollutants into receiving waters of the state. Operations have been identified that have the greatest likelihood to cause pollution to stormwater runoff. The municipal employees, the facilitators of those operations, are educated and trained in standard operation procedures for reducing pollutants from entering the storm sewer system. Actions that are performed are noted on the City of Kearney’s website, in the Smart Maps link, or by clicking here.

Street Sweepers

 

Post-Construction Stormwater Management

Post-Construction Stormwater Management

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #5 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to ensure the quality of water leaving a previously completed construction site remains continuously treated prior to leaving the property. With the implementation of specifically required Stormwater Treatment Facilities (STFs) the quality of water will have the best chance of remaining clean prior to entering the receiving waters of the state (Platte and Wood Rivers).

SEDIMENT FOREBAY
Rain Garden
Bioswale

Construction Stormwater Management

Construction Stormwater Management

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #4 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff from construction activities that result in land disturbance. An Erosion and Sediment Control program is being followed and an ordinance has been enacted within the City Code. Design standards meeting the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) and the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit requirements are available on the City website. There are Erosion and Sediment Control best management practices (BMPs) for a construction site no matter what the size. 

Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

Minimum Control Measure (MCM) #3 of the Stormwater Management Plan

The purpose of this MCM is to minimize the effect of illicit discharges and illicit connections within the community. An IDDE program is followed and an ordinance has been enacted within the City Code. Dry weather inspections of storm sewer outfalls are regularly performed. A detailed storm sewer system is maintained to track flow of stormwater and identify affected areas from illicit discharges.  Access Kearney on the City of Kearney’s website allows the public to acknowledge their concerns regarding all forms of stormwater pollution. 

Kearney Construction Stormwater Ordinance

The City of Kearney, NE has implemented several water quality improving ordinances over the years. The specific purpose of these ordinances is to positively affect the quality of stormwater runoff before it reaches the receiving waters of the Platte and Wood Rivers. A presentation of this information can be found by going to the website click here.

 

 

Waterwise Wednesday: Best Choices for De-icing

1. Scoop snow onto the lawn before it melts and creates an ice layer. It’s the most environmentally friendly for plants, animals, and concrete. Plus there’s the benefit of exercise.

2. No-salt de-icer. If an ice layer does form, scoop the snow to the yard, then employ a no salt deicer to melt the ice layer for easier removal. Look for labels containing magnesium acetate (CMA) which is less harmful to animals and plants. Follow directions on the package for use, CMA is often blended with other ingredients for effectiveness that may become harmful to plants or animals in larger quantities.

3. Salt as a last resort. Salt is highly corrosive, can irritate a pet’s paws or children’s skin, burn the plants it contacts, and leach into the soil. Use salt “Sparingly and Caringly” about .08 ounce, just under a ½ teaspoon, per square foot where there’s high pedestrian traffic. Salts are often listed as chlorides -sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, or calcium chloride – on deicer packaging.