Waterwise Wednesday: Shower Challenge

Can you take a two minute shower? South Africa’s top music artists recorded two-minute versions of some of their most popular songs to help Capetown resident’s stick to recommended two-minute shower. Check out the music and the website to see how well you can soap and sing at the same time.

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TAKE A LISTEN: SA’s biggest artists have cut down their top tracks so you can save water and stick to the recommended shower time of 2 minutes or less during the Cape’s water crisis.

Waterwise Wednesday: Wake up! Our Water Makes Great Coffee

The Panhandle’s hard water makes great coffee. Our hard water contains “sticky” minerals like calcium and magnesium, while the coffee beans contain compounds like citric acid, lactic acid, and eugenol (a compound that adds a “woodsy” taste) that give coffee its distinct flavor and aroma. The minerals stick, or attract, the compounds while brewing providing more flavor to the coffee.

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Waterwise Wednesday: Enjoying the Fruits of the Harvest

Its harvest time for all those rain-barrel-watered garden veggies.

Save water during cooking by rinsing the produce in a large bowl of water and gently scrubbing with a veggie brush. Steam the veggies instead of boiling – it preserves nutrients in addition to water. If you choose to boil, use the minimum amount of water and save it to water plants later.

And to preserve fruits and veggies, eat them in order, starting with the things that will go bad the soonest:

First: bananas, berries, cherries, kiwis, avocado, spinach, lettuce, and grapes

Second: tomatoes, mango, peaches, pears, melon, apricots, and zucchini

Third: cucumbers, pineapple, and pomegranates

Last: carrots, potatoes, celery, apples, grapefruit, and oranges

Photo © Liz Van Steenburgh

 

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Waterwise Wednesday: It’s more than Big City

Denver’s Confluence Park, Chicago’s Riverwalk, and New York’s Highline Park are pretty, practical, and productive venues in their cities.
They’re all stormwater structures serving multiple purposes like water quality, flood prevention, recreation, habitat, and even economic development.

Scottsbluff’s Broadway bulb-outs, Riverside fishing ponds, and parking lot gardens follow the same philosophies using green infrastructure to provide not only water quality treatment but also places of recreation for our residents, habitats for a healthier environment, and ways to improve our quality of life.

Photos:
Riverside Ponds, L. Sato
Chicago Riverwalk, Armondo Sanchez, Chicago Tribune

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Waterwise Wednesday: The Dirty on Clean Laundry

The average US family of four generates 300 loads of laundry a year and uses 6,000-12,000 gallons of water to get them clean. Depending on the efficiency of the washer, each load uses 15 gallons (high-efficiency front load) to 40 gallons (traditional top load with vertical agitator) of water.

Save water by washing only full loads and save energy by using cold water and hanging your clothes out to dry instead of running them through the dryer.

Photo © Faidoi

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Waterwise Wednesday: Multipurpose Ponds

Did you know the Riverside Park fishing ponds also help manage the city’s stormwater runoff?

The ponds at Riverside Park provide scenic greenspace, recreation, and even food (fish) while safely routing and cleaning our stormwater runoff on the way to the North Platte River. Terrytown and Gering include Terry’s Lake and the water hazards at Monument Shadows Golf Course in their stormwater systems too.

Stormwater travels untreated through the storm sewer, so protecting stormwater runoff from pollutants also protects our public fishing, our scenic water spaces, and our water recreation.

Photo: Riverside Fishing Bridge by L. Sato

Waterwise Wednesday: Happy 4th of July!

We wish you a Happy Fourth of July.
Here’s some water tips to keep the holiday fun and enjoyable.

1. Stay hydrated to avoid heat illness.
2. Be a safe swimmer.
3. Practice safe boating
4. Soak spent fireworks before disposing.
5. Have fun!

Photo © Creative Commons Zero (CC0)

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Waterwise Wednesday: Urban Heat Island

Ever notice how downtown is warmer than a park on hot summer day? That’s the heat island effect. Heat reflects off of concrete, buildings, pavement, and streets causing the immediate air temperature to rise as much as ten degrees.

Trees, shrubs, vines, grasses, and ground cover plants shade surfaces and evapotranspire (water emitted from leaves is evaporated). These processes cool the surrounding air. Hence, the cooling effect of a park or greenspace.

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Waterwise Wednesday: Nebraska Natives

Our downtown native landscapes serve many functions: to absorb and purify water, stormwater managements, water conservation, beautification, and inspiration. Enjoy these Nebraska native plants from the Guadalupe Center’s pollinator garden.

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