February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Good Housekeeping & Pollution Prevention is an internal measure. Here, we focus on providing training to staff to control pollution, maintaining and executing a street sweeping schedule, and flushing and maintenance of the storm sewer pipes and inlets. The overall goal is to minimize the stormwater pollution impact through daily operations.

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Post-Construction Stormwater Management primarily works to ensure the stormwater treatment facilities installed during construction are maintained and functioning as designed. This effort maintains the cleanliness of the stormwater that leaves our city even through progress and growth. Our Post-Construction Guidance Manual can be found here: http://bit.ly/3mYixev

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Pollution often starts at construction sites but it doesn’t have to. The people working on a construction site are a first line of defense for our rivers. Implementing design standards, best management practices, and erosion control measures can keep dirt, chemicals, and trash out of our streets and storm sewers. Find construction guidance here: https://bit.ly/34T1wMM

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Illicit discharges occur when chemicals, fertilizers, waste, and trash get into our storm system. You can help by properly disposing of household hazardous wastes and reporting any questionable discharges you see. Find more information here: http://bit.ly/34QR9sU

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Volunteers are the single greatest asset to our stormwater program. These people work to prevent pollution which then preserves our drinking water, recreational waters, and agricultural waters. Our volunteers protect our way of life. Volunteer here: http://bit.ly/2WRCRUr

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

We believe that by informing the public about pollutants in our area and providing ways to prevent that pollution, we can reduce the number of pollutants entering our waterways. Test your stormwater knowledge here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WKPJM7D

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

The City of Grand Island follows a Stormwater Management Plan to improve the quality of stormwater runoff from an area 2 miles larger than city limits. This plan is regulated by the EPA and the State of Nebraska. It includes 6 minimum control measures to be met and documented:
1. Public Education & Outreach
2. Public Involvement & Participation
3. Illicit Discharge Detection & Elimination
4. Construction Stormwater Requirements & Control Measures
5. Post-Construction Stormwater Management Program
6. Pollution Prevention & Good Housekeeping

Trickle Down Thursday: Illicit Discharge

Anything that isn’t strictly composed of storm water is considered an illicit discharge and we are working to eliminate those occurrences. Now, that definition is pretty broad. Not only are we talking about obvious pollution like a neighbor pouring paint down the storm drain, but illicit discharges also include: chemicals dripping from the engines from our vehicles, excess fertilizers and pesticides from our lawncare routine, soap and detergents from washing our cars on our driveway, trash and debris blowing around after an event, and even juices dripping out of a dumpster. You can help keep these pollutants out of our waterways by: properly disposing of household hazardous wastes, remembering to wash your car on your lawn, and reporting any questionable actions or unnatural water flows. Find more here: http://bit.ly/34QR9sU

Trickle Down Thursday: The Cost of Water

Take a moment to consider: how much do you spend on bottled water? Where does that bottled water come from? What makes it preferable to filling a glass from the tap? What are your reasons for buying bottled water? Do those reasons outweigh the price? Learn more about tap water: http://bit.ly/3aY7yQ9