POROUS PAVEMENT

Porous Pavement

Porous pavement allows stormwater and snow melt to pass through voids in the paved surface and infiltrate into the subbase. This type of drainage allows for less chance of ice on the roads to to quicker dispersal time. Porous pavement may be constructed from four basic material types:

  1. Asphalt
  2. Concrete
  3. Paver Blocks
  4. Plastic Grid Systems

For more information on porous pavement please visit www.werf.org

POCKET WETLANDS

Pocket Wetland

Pocket wetlands in urban areas filter, clean, and store water from multiple sources. They’re a place for rain and snow/ice melt to drain to. Wetlands act like sponges by holding flood waters and keeping rivers at normal levels. Multiple types of designs for pocket wetlands exist, with the volume, dry storage, and pond depth being the deciding differences. For more information on pocket wetlands please visit www.werf.org

MEET OUR STREET SWEEPERS

Meet Our Street Sweepers

Street sweepers are an effective tool against pollutants on the street getting into the storm sewer system. But to be effective they must move slowly. Studies have shown the optimum speed for a sweeper is 5 miles per hour. Fortunately, they are big-white- and have flashing lights to alert you of their slower speeds. Please proceed with caution when you see these slow moving vehicles.

LEAVE IT ON THE LAWN

Leave It On The Lawn

When leaves fall to the ground, they eventually break down and provide nutrients for the soil, helping prepare more plants to grow in the spring. When you keep leaves out of the street you help your yard AND the storm sewer system, which can get clogged with leaves as they freeze and take up valuable space designated for water. If you don’t like the look of leaves in your yard, take advantage of the City of Kearney’s landfill which is open Monday-Friday from 8a.m.-5p.m. For more specific information about the landfill click here.

STABILIZED ENTRANCE

Stabilized Entrance

Construction sites should implement a stabilized entrance, commonly referred to as a ‘rock entrance,’ in multiple cases:

  1. Where dirt or mud can be tracked onto roads
  2. If they’re adjacent to water bodies
  3. If they have poorly compacted soil
  4. Where dust is a problem during dry weather

 

The City of Kearney has detailed specifications on rock entrances in the Public Works Department link at the sediment and erosion control details page.

SOIL AMENDMENTS

Soil Amendments

A good soil is just like a good recipe, they both need key ingredients to be successful. The two main ingredients in soil are sand and clay. Various other minerals like limestone, sulfer, and others are added to it in smaller doses. A “good” soil is considered a medium loam and roughly consists of:

 

  • 10% coarse sand
  • 45% fine sand
  • 20% silt
  • 15% clay
  • 10% organic material

Please visit landscaping.about.com for more information on soil amending.

COMPOSTING PROCESS

Composting Process

Heat generated from bacteria causes the compost pile to stay warm and active, no matter which season you’re in. Ideally, new material should be added to the composting system during turning and mixing to keep the pile the most active. Visit www.earth911.com to find more information on different composting methods including hot, cold, sheet, and trench composting. Also, to find out what items are good types of compost click here for lists of acceptable and unacceptable materials.

 

 

 

 

 

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STORMWATER RUNOFF

Stormwater Runoff

Stormwater runoff comes from precipitation events and when snow/ice melts onto impervious surfaces. An inch of rain on an acre of land is equivalent to 27,154 gallons of water with a weight of 113 tons. This water transports many pollutants, including but not limited to sediment, oil, grease, fertilizers, bacteria from pet waste, and litter/trash. Stormwater DOES NOT get treated prior to being flushed into waterways.

Infiltration Practices

INFILTRATION PRACTICES

Infiltration practices are designs that enhance water percolation through the soil and remove pollutants in the process. A ‘Rain Garden’ is a common residential design, and an aesthetically appealing project! As snow melts, it’s runoff accumulates in these depressed/trenched areas. Captured water generally leaves to the neighboring soils within 48 hours. Directing water from roof downspouts or paved areas enable the removal of pollutants prior to discharge into receiving waters. For more information visit the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation.

Downspout Redirection

Downspout Redirection

Take full advantage of the rain showers this spring by redirecting your downspouts onto your yards. Make sure your downspouts deposit rainwater where it can be put to good use. The amount of rainwater that gets into the street will be greatly reduced and your gardens and yards will benefit greatly from it. Remember to try to direct rainwater at least 5 feet from house foundations to prevent potential leakage! For more information visit the Water Environment and Reuse Foundation.