Scottsbluff-Gering Wildflower Week Events

Friday, June 8,  10:00 AM – 11:30 AM   City of Gering’s Nebraska Statewide Arboretum site tour.  Meet at Gering City Plaza, 11th Avenue and N Street. Tour stops:  Plaza Project, Monument Heights Island, Legacy of the Plains. Public invited to attend

Friday, June 8, Noon – 1:30 “Imagine the Possibilities”  Green

Team Luncheon.        Past and present Green Team or Greener Nebraska Towns team members are invited to brainstorm future public/private partnership projects and resources in the tri-city area.  Please RSVP to 630-8011 before Wednesday, June 6 if you plan to attend

Friday, June 8, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM City of Scottsbluff Downtown Project Tour.   Meet at the Downtown Plaza. Tour stops:  Bulb-outs, parking lot rain gardens, Wellhouse 3, Guadalupe Center. Public invited to attend.

Friday, June 8, 4:30 PM  – 6:30 PM  Panhandle Planning Team BBQ @ Peaceful Prairie.  Panhandle Wildflower Week Planning Team to meet at Peaceful Prairie

Friday, June 8, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Twilight Wildflower Hike at Wildcat Hills with Amanda Filipi.  Meet at Wildcat Hills Nature Center.  Public invited to attend.

Saturday, June 9, 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM  Demonstration planting at Nebraska Pioneer Stadium.   Please call 436-3307 if interested in volunteering.

2018 Wildflower Week Events in Western Nebraska

June 2 near Lewellen. Wildflower Talk and Walk at Ash Hollow State Historical Park at 9am. Meet at the Visitor Center and dress for walking through tallgrass prairie. 308-778-5651, alison.bleich@nebraska.gov

June 3 near Harrison. “Wildflowers 101” talk and walk with a ranger through lowlands, prairie and rocky uplands to see a variety of wildflowers 2-4pm at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument visitor center, 301 River Rd. Trails are open dawn to dusk. agfo_ranger_activities@nps.gov, 308-665-4110

June 7 in Chadron. Western Nebraska Landscape: planting project, water use tour and wildflower presentation.  Meet at 9am at Chadron State College Range Land Lab, wear gardening togs and sunscreen; ends at noon. lmays@csc.edu

June 8 near Gering. “Wildflower Walk in the Wildcats” 7pm at the Wildcat Hills Nature Center, 210615 Hwy 71, Gering NE 69341. ngpc.wildcat.hills@nebraska.gov , 308-436-3777

June 8 in Gering. Tour of municipal landscapes 10-11:30am starting from Gering City Plaza, 11th Street and N St. 308-436-6834, pheath@gering.org

June 8 in Scottsbluff. “Imagine the Possibilities” brainstorming session with past and present Green Team or Greener Nebraska Town members from 12-1:30pm at Monument Shadows Grill.  Please RSVP by June 6.  308-630-8011, lsato@scottsbluff.org

June 8 in Scottsbluff. Tour of downtown landscapes from 2-3pm starting from 19th & Broadway. 308-630-8011, lsato@scottsbluff.org

June 10 near Harrison. “Wildflowers 101” talk and walk with a ranger through lowlands, prairie and rocky uplands to see a variety of wildflowers 2-4pm at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument visitor center, 301 River Rd. Trails are open dawn to dusk. agfo_ranger_activities@nps.gov, 308-665-4110

June 14 in Ogallala. During the Summer Concert Series, the 2nd street bump-outs with wildflower planters between Spruce and East A will be highlighted; concerts are in Rendezvous Square on East 2nd.

 

 

 

 

Waterwise Wednesday: Managing Stormwater Runoff

While it’s unusual to get the amount of rain we had two weeks ago, it does remind us to take some flood precautions.

1. Basement windows or doors are common storm water entry points and should be sealed against leaks. Clear plastic covers or window wells that extend above ground level can help. Ideally, window and door sills should at least a foot above ground level.

2. Slope the yard away from the foundation to prevent water from pooling near the house and leaking into the basement. Create a rain garden or low basin landscaped with shrubs and flowers to encourage water to soak into the ground.

3. Eliminate paved surfaces where possible and consider alternatives that allow water to soak into the ground. Consider porous concrete or porous pavers for driveways. Gravel or woodchips for walking paths.

4. Aim downspouts toward the lawn and away from the foundation and paved surfaces. Consider using cisterns or rain barrels to catch rainwater for watering lawns and gardens in dry weather.

Photo: Creative Commons

Waterwise Wednesday: Garden Hose Tips

Use an adjustable shut-off nozzle which can be down to fine spray so that water flows only as needed. Turn it of at the faucet instead of the nozzle when finished to avoid leaks.

Use hose washers between spigots and water hoses to eliminate leaks.

Do not leave sprinklers or hoses unattended. 600 gallons or more can flow in only a few hours. Set a shut-off reminder to turn it off.

 

Check all hoses, connectors and spigots regularly.

Install ornamental water features, like fountains, only if the water is recycled. 

 

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Photo: © Creative Commons Zero (CC0)

Waterwise Wedneday: Lawn Watering Tips

Don’t overwater your lawn and remember a hearty rain eliminates the need for watering for as long as two weeks.

Water lawns early in the morning – the lower temperature and wind speed are reduce evaporation.

Position sprinklers to water the lawn and shrubs … not the paved areas.

 

 

 

Raise the mower to at least three inches.   Image may contain: grass, shoes, outdoor and natureTaller grass encourages deeper rooting and shades the roots to retain soil moisture.

Avoid overfertilizing. Fertilizers increase the need for water and mowing.

Sweep, not wash, clippings back to the lawn from the driveway or sidewalk. Washing the driveway can waste hundreds of gallons of water.

Waterwise Wednesday: Landscape Tips

1.  Mulch to retain soil moisture and control weeds.

2. Plant native and/or drought-tolerant grasses, ground covers, shrubs and trees. Once established, they do not need to be watered as frequently and they usually will survive a dry period without any watering.

3. Group plans together based on similar water needs.

4. Choose the right water system for the job. Drip irrigation and soaker hoses work well in plant beds, while sprinklers work better on the lawn.

Photo © Creative Commons Zero (CC0)

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