Waterwise Wednesday: Natural Clog Buster

Got a slow moving drain? Skip caustic chemicals and flush the drain with vinegar and baking soda. Vinegar and baking soda can clear out grease and dissolve organic material trapped in your pipes.

Start by pouring a pot of boiling water down the drain. Then sprinkle one cup of baking soda into the drain, quickly followed by a cup of vinegar. Insert the drain cap or a rag to keep the bubbles working in the pipe. Let the mixture sit in the pipes for 15 minutes to an hour Finish with one more flush of boiling water down the pipes.

Water Quality Wednesday: Drops to Watts

Ever considered the electrical cost of water?

“Homes with electric water heaters, for example, spend one-fourth of their total electric bills just to heat water,” according to EPA. It takes energy to pump, treat, deliver and heat the water we use. Running a faucet for five minutes uses about as much energy as letting a 60-watt light bulb run for 14 hours.

Pay yourself, literally, by using Water Sense and Energy Star qualified devices like water heaters, dishwashers, sprinkler systems, shower heads, toilets and faucets. They’re designed to save both water and electricity.

 

 

Waterwise Wednesday: Policy Works

Researchers, led by Estelle Chaussard from the University of Buffalo, link ground water recovery in Santa Clara Valley California to the state’s newly instated water conservation efforts—policies that diverted surface water to refill aquifers

In 2013, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSARa) measured a 2-centimeter decrease in ground-level elevation, followed by another 3 centimeters in 2014. The research team estimates a groundwater loss of about a tenth of a cubic kilometer caused the ground to shrink or lower.

Ground surfaces began to expand and rise in September 2015, rising nearly 2 centimeters over the next two years and were at pre-study levels by the end of 2016. This reflects the same time surface water diversion policy went into effect.

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MEET OUR STREET SWEEPERS

Meet Our Street Sweepers

Street sweepers are an effective tool against pollutants on the street getting into the storm sewer system. But to be effective they must move slowly. Studies have shown the optimum speed for a sweeper is 5 miles per hour. Fortunately, they are big-white- and have flashing lights to alert you of their slower speeds. Please proceed with caution when you see these slow moving vehicles.

Waterwise Wednesday: Levees of Leaves

  Falling leaves signal the official arrival of Autumn. Put leaves to good use as insulating mulch in a garden bed, make them into compost, or shred them across the lawn as a natural fertilizer. Left to lie in gutters, leaves quickly clog storm drains leading to flooding in a Fall storm and nutrient pollution as the leaves degrade in the storm sewer. Pile ’em up and enjoy the benefits of leaves next spring!

LEAVE IT ON THE LAWN

Leave It On The Lawn

When leaves fall to the ground, they eventually break down and provide nutrients for the soil, helping prepare more plants to grow in the spring. When you keep leaves out of the street you help your yard AND the storm sewer system, which can get clogged with leaves as they freeze and take up valuable space designated for water. If you don’t like the look of leaves in your yard, take advantage of the City of Kearney’s landfill which is open Monday-Friday from 8a.m.-5p.m. For more specific information about the landfill click here.

Waterwise Wednesday: Toothbrush Challenge

Can you brush your teeth, including rinsing your mouth and toothbrush, with a 1/4 cup of water?

Yes, it is possible!

Americans waste up to eight gallons of water each tooth-brushing session. Simply turning off the tap while brushing your teeth can save over 100 gallons per month.

Pollution Prevention Series

Please click the links below for more information on how individual business can help prevent stormwater runoff pollution!!

Pollution Prevention for Auto Servicing

Pollution Prevention for Concrete Industry

Pollution Prevention for Fueling Stations

Pollution Prevention for Restaurants

Pollution Prevention for the Auto Repair Industry

Waterwise Wednesday: Nebraska Water Trivia

1. True or False: Nebraska houses the most miles of river in the U.S.

2. True or False: Nebraska manufactures and uses the most center pivot irrigation systems in the world.

3. True or False: Nebraska contains the most groundwater of the fifty states.

1. True. Four major rivers, and many small rivers, flow nearly 23,000 miles across the state.

2. True. The top four center pivot system manufacturers are based in Nebraska and supply 85% of the global demand. Nebraska manufactures utilizes about 60,000 center pivot systems.

3. True. We sit on the High Plains Aquifer, which reaches eight states, the largest source of groundwater in the U.S.

STABILIZED ENTRANCE

Stabilized Entrance

Construction sites should implement a stabilized entrance, commonly referred to as a ‘rock entrance,’ in multiple cases:

  1. Where dirt or mud can be tracked onto roads
  2. If they’re adjacent to water bodies
  3. If they have poorly compacted soil
  4. Where dust is a problem during dry weather

 

The City of Kearney has detailed specifications on rock entrances in the Public Works Department link at the sediment and erosion control details page.