Waterwise Wednesday: Spring Fever

Photo © Publicdomainphotos

Spring is just around the corner. Learn to mimic nature in this year’s landscape to capture, treat and reuse stormwater which also conserves, preserves and protects our water and water quality.

– Plant native and/or drought-tolerant grasses, ground covers, shrubs and trees that won’t need as much watering once established. Group plants together based on similar water needs.

– Explore alternatives to a lawn-based yard. Consider adding a bioswale or rain garden to capture and infiltrate runoff.

– Disconnect down spouts and direct roof runoff to gardens and lawns instead, putting runoff to good use.

– Convert paved areas to more permeable surfaces to promote infiltration and groundwater recharge.

– Use compost or weed-free mulch on your garden to hold soil moisture and help keep soil from washing away.

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Runoff = water that can’t soak into the ground. This water flows across rooftops, pavement, bare soil, and sloped lawns. As it flows it picks up sand, pesticides, bacteria, oils, metals, and solvents and carries these things directly into the storm drain. Polluted runoff is not treated before it reaches the river. This is the same river where we swim, hunt, fish, and play. To find out what you can do to keep our lakes and rivers clean, go here: http://bit.ly/3aRYfBd

Waterwise Wednesday: Goin’ to the Dogs (and Cats)

Photo © Sunheyy

February holds several dog and cat designations: Dog Education Month, National Cat Health Month, Pet Dental Health Month and Responsible Pet Owners Month.

Part of good pet care is properly disposing of their waste. Pet waste is a leading source of both nutrient and bacteria pollution to urban streams and waterways. Feces carry concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and pathogens like Salmonella, E. Coli, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium.

Pet waste pathogens threaten the safety garden grown food and drinking water supplies and can lead to severe intestinal diseases in humans when ingested.

Avoid expose family and friends by picking up and properly disposing pet waste. Pet waste be collected then either flushed or sacked and placed in the trash.

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Good Housekeeping & Pollution Prevention is an internal measure. Here, we focus on providing training to staff to control pollution, maintaining and executing a street sweeping schedule, and flushing and maintenance of the storm sewer pipes and inlets. The overall goal is to minimize the stormwater pollution impact through daily operations.

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Post-Construction Stormwater Management primarily works to ensure the stormwater treatment facilities installed during construction are maintained and functioning as designed. This effort maintains the cleanliness of the stormwater that leaves our city even through progress and growth. Our Post-Construction Guidance Manual can be found here: http://bit.ly/3mYixev

Waterwise Wednesday: No Salt, Please

big salt in the plate isolated over white

Just one teaspoon of salt in five gallons of water creates a concentration toxic to some aquatic life and increases the corrosivness of water.

Road salts and most deicers contain chloride. When the snow and ice melt, the salty runoff flows down the storm drains to the North Platte River. Chloride is virtually impossible to remove from a waterbody.

Avoid chloride pollution with these tips:
– Shovel early and often to prevent snow compaction and ice formation.

– Scrape ice with an ice scraper or ice chisel.

– Salt or de-ice as a last resort. Salt or de-ice ONLY if pavement temperature is warm enough for application to be effective. Otherwise, lightly sprinkle sand for traction.

– Sweep residue after the melt to prevent residual salt, de-icer, or sand from washing into storm drains.

Photo © Ivan Kopylov

February: Stormwater Management

This month, the City of Grand Island will be posting a quick overview of how we comply with federal Stormwater Management regulations. If you would like more information please go to www.Grand-Island.com

Pollution often starts at construction sites but it doesn’t have to. The people working on a construction site are a first line of defense for our rivers. Implementing design standards, best management practices, and erosion control measures can keep dirt, chemicals, and trash out of our streets and storm sewers. Find construction guidance here: https://bit.ly/34T1wMM