Waterwise Wednesday: Thanks! For Saving Water on Thanksgiving

Here’s some ways to save water as you celebrate the holiday . . .

1. The Big Thaw. Thaw the turkey in the refrigerator instead of cold water. Remember, to put it in pan to catch leaking juices.

2. Bathe instead of shower. Wash vegetables in a large bowl of water, instead of under running water. Then use the water to soak the roasting pan or dirty utensils before washing them.

3. Steam instead of boil – not only will you use less water, you’ll also preserve more nutrients and vitamins.

4. Track the glass. Use wine glass charms, ribbon, or different color yarn to keep track of your glass throughout the day instead of reaching for clean one each refill. K

5. Easy reach. Keep one pitcher of cold water on the table for water glass refills. Keep a second to collect the half-full glasses at day’s end for plant or pet water.

6. Scrape dishes into the compost or trash rather than rinsing food scraps down the garbage disposal, which clogs pipes with oil and grease.

7. Thank goodness for dishwashers – ENERGY STAR – rated dishwashers can use as little as three gallons per load. If you have to wash dishes by hand, fill one basin with wash water and the other with rinse water.

 

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Free photo 82950340 © creativecommonsstockphotos – Dreamstime.com

Waterwise Wednesday: Fighting for a Cause Has an Effect

Photo: Instagram.com/alisonsadventures
Nearly two years ago Alison Teal, Time Magazine’s Female Indiana Jones, posted a video taped in a polluted Los Angeles river which spurred California to ban the plastic bag.

To see more of Alison’s creative global environmental accomplishments check out her website below.

https://alisonsadventures.com/

Waterwise Wednesday: A New Part of the Food Chain?

Photo © publicdomainphotographs

It’s official, microplastics have invaded the world – including the human body. As microplastics travel through our world’s waterways, they reach the remotest of areas – and people. National Geographic details more…

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/10/news-plastics-microplastics-human-feces/

Waterwise Wednesday: Have a Green Halloween!

Use these tips for a cleaner more environmentally friendly night.

1. Walk, bike, or carpool your trick-or-treating route.

2. Collect treats in a reusable treat bag.

3. Keep candy wrappers or other trash from littering the sidewalk and gutters as you hop from house to house.

Photo © creativecommonsstockphotos – Dreamstime.com

Image may contain: one or more people

Waterwise Wednesday: Congratulations!

Antelope Creek, which runs through the heart of Lincoln, has been removed from the national list of impaired waters.

Antelope Creek’s E. coli bacteria levels were more than 25 times the water quality standard when it was added to the Clean Water Act list of impaired waters in 2004.

Fifteen stormwater quality improvement projects, two major flood control projects, rain gardens, and permeable pavers have not only cleaned the creek, but made a viable outdoor recreation area with about eleven miles of bike trail.

Photo: Antelope Creek November 2014, L. Sato

Image may contain: outdoor, water and nature

Trickle Down Thursdays, Slow It Down and Soak It In

In an effort to better educate the public on Stormwater Management the City of Grand Island will be posting descriptions of how it complies with federal regulations every Thursday with a quick overview of their program. If you would like more information please go to the City specific website at Grand-island.com

Waterwise Wednesday: Leafy Tips

Precautionary tips since the leaves are falling …

Image may contain: nature and outdoor

1. Check and clear the gutters for leaves, if you haven’t already. Leaves can clog both street and building gutters, quickly causing flooding and water damage.

2. Wet leaves can be a slipping or fall hazard on sidewalks and curbs, so move leaves back to the yard or garden from the gutter.

3. Piles of leaves are fun to jump in, but also great habitat for beetles, mites, and other insects – and the animals that feed on them. So look before leaping into the pile.

Photo © Janeh15 – Dreamstime.com